THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE.

THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE. Withies for wattle and daub construction of walls and fences and for wicker-work were grown in coppices of various willow species. This wikipedia entry for “withy” has a photograph of “a pollarded willow with a crop of withies ready for harvest”.

Presumably the wattles for Yeats’s cabin would have come from coppicing or pollarding. The ancient method of construction of the cabin would be emblematic of an older and simpler life.

Here is the beginning of The Lake Isle of Innisfree (here on wikipedia):

“I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made…”

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One Response to THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE.

  1. Annalisa says:

    Oh! The stream or little river going through the Old Forest in The Fellowship of the Ring (where your favorite character, Tom Bombadil, resides) is called the Withywindle. Now I know why!

    Also, in one of my enduring favorite books, Catherine, Called Birdy, she helps the villagers mix the sludgy mud, manure, and hair concoction for a wattle-and-daub cottage. Birdy likes to mix (using her feet) while others weave the thin willow branches.

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