FLATNESS AND THE SINGLE-LENS VIEW.

FLATNESS AND THE SINGLE-LENS VIEW. I posted here on the theory of Margaret Livingstone, a Harvard professor of neurobiology, that it is an advantage for an artist to have poor depth perception. (Professor Livingstone uses the example of Rembrandt.) Hockney’s insight that “drawing is fundamentally about constructing a two-dimensional image of three-dimensional space” may be an explanation for that advantage. It may be easier to construct that two-dimensional image if you are used to seeing the world as flat. Gayford’s article on Hockney makes the point that Renaissance-style single-­vanishing-point perspectives are an optical property of a single-lens view, a view where only one eye is used (or at least one eye is dominant).

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One Response to FLATNESS AND THE SINGLE-LENS VIEW.

  1. Pingback: THE HOCKNEY-FALCO THESIS—HOW THE OLD MASTERS DID IT. | Pater Familias

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