ENFORCING A 55 MPH LIMIT WHEN EVERY CAR IS GOING 75.

ENFORCING A 55 MPH LIMIT WHEN EVERY CAR IS GOING 75. I had been thinking about the previous post since I read the Custance article. I was not thinking about any particular game. Nevertheless, so that people who are not diehard fans can evaluate this, here is a typical article about Glenn Davis, who weighs 295 pounds, being concussed the other night. The writer describes Davis as “staggering concussed down the court, tilting harder and harder to his left, a boxer out on his feet,” and essentially takes what happened to Davis as an amusing example of “playoff basketball.” And here is a quote (from this article) about another call in that game: “When the speed limit is 55, and every single car goes 75, what’s the one guy who gets pulled over supposed to think? Is that justice, or an almost random reminder who’s in charge?” It’s a good metaphor for “playoff basketball” rules.

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One Response to ENFORCING A 55 MPH LIMIT WHEN EVERY CAR IS GOING 75.

  1. Mary Jane Schaefer says:

    I saw this when it happened, and it was sickening. Davis was scrambling to get back on his feet, while nine other men, plus referees, were running quickly to the other side of the court. One camera angle showed Doc Rivers on his feet, frantically waving for Davis to get going, and the poor guy was trying to, although his eyes looked weird and he clearly was in bad shape. A referee came forward and put his arms around him, both to support him and to prevent him from attempting to run down the court. Personally, I think Playoff Basketball should be refereed just as regular basketball is, and that it all should be refereed better than it is. The idea of rookies not getting calls as part of a hazing process and stars getting special dispensations smacks more of medieval hierarchy than a game with fair rules fairly applied.

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