ART IS WHAT REMAINS WHEN THE POLITICS IS GONE.

ART IS WHAT REMAINS WHEN THE POLITICS IS GONE. In TIMEBENDS, Miller tells of overhearing an English couple at an English production of THE CRUCIBLE in 1965. They did not think of the play in terms of Senator Joseph McCarthy. One of them remarked that the play might have something to do with an American senator whose name they couldn’t remember. Miller was happy that the political dimensions of the play had fallen away: “The play had now become art, cut from its roots, a spectacle of human passions purely.”

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One Response to ART IS WHAT REMAINS WHEN THE POLITICS IS GONE.

  1. Elmer says:

    But the politics are there. Once my wife Margo took a mathematician who was a candidate for a job at William and Mary to a performance of the Crucible at the college. When Margo met the woman, she realized her English wasn’t very good, so Margo pointed out that the candidate, who would have been tired from the interviewing, could go home at intermission if she wanted. Well, the first act took about two hours, but when Margo asked the candidate what she wanted to do, it turned out she was enthralled; she had never seen a play that wasn’t about a tractor. But what she couldn’t get over was that something like this had happened in America. Elmer

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